Showing posts with label book review. Show all posts
Showing posts with label book review. Show all posts

Monday, February 13, 2017

alongside {book review and giveaway!!}




What do you do when a dear friend finds out they have cancer? What do you do when your neighbor, whom you've only met once, experiences a significant loss? What do you do when a family in your church encounters crisis after crisis? How do you help? What can you do? Should you do anything?

Alongside by Sarah Beckman seeks to answer all of these questions with solid, researched advice, much of it drawn from her experiences and the experiences of people she interviewed, all who have been through - or are in the middle of - crisis. I wish I had fifteen (or more!) copies of this book to give away. I wish all of the parents I have met who lost children had people in their lives who read this book, because some of the comments and actions that I have heard about have made a devastating loss even more so. I wish I had a copy of this in my hands years ago, but I am glad to have it as a resource now.



Beckman covers everything from what level of response to a crisis one should have based on their relationship: from Tier 1 to Tier 4 (this is so helpful for those who are trying to navigate how to respond to friends and acquaintances in times of need) to what to say and not to say, and what gifts / offers might be appropriate.

I especially appreciated Backman being honest enough in her writing to admonish people to keep their focus outward and make sure their purpose and intentions are to serve, not glean information, or show off how much they are assisting. Motivations get mixed sometimes and it is important to remember that helping someone through a major life event is for and about them.


Alongside is a useful guide one can pull out again and again as different events in life happen. There are practical gift guides, helpful websites, and practical advice spread throughout the book. You can either read it front to back or use it as a reference guide as needs arise.



I highly recommend this book for everyone who is trying to live out the Biblical edict to love one's neighbor (which is everyone by the way, not just the people next door or across the street). And even if you are not a Christian there is practical, helpful advice within these pages if you are walking through a difficult time with someone.

Thanks to the Blythe Daniel Agency and The Blog About Network I have one copy of Alongside - signed by the author! - to give away. Please leave a comment if you are interested in winning a copy. I'll choose a winner on Friday, February 17th!

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

nothing to prove {book review}



In Nothing to Prove Jennie Allen writes about the abundance of God's love and how we need to put down whatever we are carrying, whatever is slowing us down, or causing us to be numb, or making us strive, and realize that God is enough and He has us in the palm of his hand, we just need to quiet ourselves and rely on Him.

In the second half of the book Allen focuses on various chapters in the book of John and relates them to God's Streams of Enoughness. Those chapters made the book come alive for me. I often feel like I should be doing more for others. I get stuck in routine, we all do, and before I know it we're already a month into 2017 and a lot of the 2016 goals and promises I had in mind have fallen by the wayside.

I was especially convicted by Allen's exhortation to rely on God and let my life and mission flow from that dependent relationship.

Allen writes, "Consider the things that are holding you back - the things you say you don't have enough of .... Now I want you to picture the streets in heaven. I want you to picture streets as far as you can see and every street is full of warehouses as far as you can see.
I just want you to picture all that God has and all that He wants to do.
Then you land in heaven with him. He looks you in the eyes and says, 'I wanted to go crazy through you. I wanted to change your neighborhood, your city. And you kept going up to your room and watching Netflix.'"

For me it's reading a book instead of Netflix, but it's the same general idea! God wants us to be His voice and He wants to work through us, but we have to let go of our fear and anything else that is holding us back and let Him.

Lately my story, my life, my habits have been focused inward. I've been focused on me and how I am feeling and how I need to get better because I can't continue as I have been, but what I really need to do is put all of my need on God and turn my focus outwards. Because I am not the only one who feels like life is hard and overwhelming, and as I learned with my last post, being honest and reaching out leads to more connections and deeper friendships.

It was just such a relief to read Nothing to Prove and be reminded that I can put everything that is going on in my life on God's shoulders and he can use it for His purposes. My life, small though it feels sometimes, can make a kingdom difference if I rely on the power of God to transform instead of my own skills and abilities. Nothing to Prove reminded me that I can't do anything without God, but with Him I can do whatever is asked of me.

“I received this book from the Blogging for Books program in exchange for this review.”

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

what falls from the sky




I selected this book on a whim. I was scrolling through a list of books, trying to decide on a title to read when the subtitle caught my eye:

What Falls From the Sky: How I Disconnected from the Internet and Reconnected with the God Who Made The Clouds

Esther Emery spent an entire year offline. No phone, no computer, no email, no facebook, no blog, no instagram ... nothing to do with the Internet for an entire year.

Could you do it?

I couldn't, but the idea of it is intriguing, so I settled in to read this book one evening and I blazed through it.

I didn't expect the writing to be so descriptive and beautiful. I didn't expect to feel so deeply for Esther and the gut wrenching upheavals that led her to go offline for a year. I loved that she didn't sugarcoat her story; instead she was brutally honest about the job she lost, the strife between her and her husband and how those things affected her life and the choices she made, and eventually led her back to God.

And the background stories that are skillfully woven throughout the book were just as interesting as Esther's reflections on her life.

It was intriguing and sometimes harrowing, to read about what it was like for the Emerys to live in close proximity to a family in crisis, but it was also a good reminder on how to love others well. And the stories about Esther's mother, who was a homesteading back to the land proponent in the 70's, were also fascinating.

Above all else Esther Emery is a good storyteller, and I enjoyed reading about her life and how she came through a time of crisis with her marriage and faith intact.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers <http://booklookbloggers.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”


*This post contains affiliate links*

Sunday, January 1, 2017

lights out {book review}


I have to keep this short since I am still dealing with one hand in a brace. Hopefully my hand will be healed soon; I am ready to have it back!

I enjoyed Ted Koppel's account of the security  risk our power grid is, but I found the first section a little too dry. I really enjoyed the third section about what to do in the event of a cyber attack, although it left me wanting to buy 5 acres and build a bunker!

I like reading disaster plan books, or what if books, because they force me to think about the emergency plans we have in place and what our family needs to do to improve. Reading Lights Out presented the opportunity to ask myself a series of questions: What would we do if the power was out for months? Could we survive? What would change? How would we need to adapt?

One concrete action I've taken since reading Lights Out was to make an emergency box solely for my son who has food allergies. In the event of a major disaster, like 1\3 of the United States being without power, it might be difficult to obtain the foods he needs to stay healthy.

Lights Out is an important book for everyone to read so that they may be prepared in case a large scale cyber  attack is perpetuated on the United States. 

Wednesday, December 21, 2016

merry christmas! {giveaway}



I'm going to keep this short and sweet because I only have one functioning hand. Thanks to The Blythe Daniel Agency and Blog About Network I have a copy of Bible Basics to give away!



This board book primer is NOT just for babies. Bennett and Ainsleigh have asked me to read our copy multiple times since we received it. Bible Basics breaks big concepts down, but leaves enough content for rich discussions. The illustrations are beautiful AND the people depicted are not white! I appreciate the opportunity for my kids to see a more accurate portrayal of Biblical characters. I think Bible Basics is an important book for parents and grandparents to have.



To enter to win a copy please leave a comment. (US residents only) That's it! Like I said, keeping it simple. I'll post the winner Friday evening! 

Friday, December 2, 2016

it's not fair: learning to love the life you didn't choose {book review}




In the middle of reading It's Not Fair I texted my best friends and said: you must read this book. Now. Right now. Drop everything. READ IT.

Okay, it wasn't quite that intense, but I was so encouraged and moved I did suggest they pick up the book soon-ish.

I think we can all relate to this book because life rarely goes as planned. And while these books often tip over into overdone sentimentality (it's fine, love Jesus more, have more faith!!) Melanie Dale throws in enough irreverence to keep it funny and away from the fake happy arena.

Melanie Dale uses her story of infertility and adoption as well as other's struggles to explore how to cope and move forward when life doesn't go according to plan. She uses humor a lot - sometimes a bit too much for me - but she also provides clear Biblical answers on how to move forward and continue living in the face of extreme pain.

I like how Dale included other people's stories, but the overall mix was off for me. In fact, I didn't like how the book was laid out at all. Maybe I would have liked it better in paper format, but the e-book formatting made the book feel a little hectic and jumbled. I did not like having random Facebook and Twitter posts interspersed throughout the book, because they were often right in the middle of a heavy chapter or paragraph.

Despite my issues with the layout I thought It's Not Fair was an excellent book for anyone who is standing in the middle of their life wondering how they got there and how to go forward on a completely different path than the one they expected their life to follow.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers <http://booklookbloggers.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”





Sunday, November 27, 2016

bible basics board book {book review}




When I saw the page proofs for Bible Basics my first thought was, why didn't I come up with this idea?!

It is brilliant.

Teaching young children Biblical concepts is really difficult, but in their new board book primer Danielle Hitchen (author) and Jessica Blanchard (illustrator) use early learning and beautiful art to introduce fundamental Biblical principles to babies and toddlers.

Instead of counting cars, trains, animals, or other popular items the Bible Basics book cleverly uses numbers to impart Biblical truths.

For example:

The number 2 explores the 2 natures of Jesus: fully man / fully God

and 

The number 8 explains the Beatitudes:



I will be getting TWO physical copies and I will be giving one away when they arrive! If you are interested in early Bible education for your children make sure you check back here soon for the giveaway!!



Thanks go to The Blythe Daniel Agency and The Blog About Network for the opportunity to review - and give away a copy! - of Bible Basics 

Thursday, November 17, 2016

journal the word bible {giveaway} - WINNER announcement!


See bottom for the winner!

This is my first time reviewing with the Blythe Daniel Agency and Blog About and I want to think them for the opportunity to review and GIVE AWAY a new Journal the Word Bible.

I've been using a copy of the NKJV Journal the Word Bible (KJV also available) for a few weeks now and I love it! We attend the Saturday night service at our church, which is much smaller than Sunday services, and on Thursday nights we gather with others from the Saturday night service to discuss the sermon and pray together. It's so helpful to have a dedicated place in my Bible to take notes since I know I will need to have them handy when we meet on Thursday nights.

I've also been using it for my Monday night Bible study and it's been so useful to have a place to write notes and comments I want to remember and keep close at hand.

My last Bible didn't have roomy margins so a lot of the pages look like this:




The Journal the Word Bible has wide lined margins so I can take notes without worrying about running out of room. You could draw in the margins as well if you are artistically inclined, which I am not!




The translation is requiring some getting used to since the Bible I've used for years isn't NKJV, but I love the wide margins so much I haven't switched back to my old Bible!

Now for the fun part: you can enter to win your own NKJV Journal the Word Bible! I will select a winner next Wednesday! 


a Rafflecopter giveaway

Saturday, November 5, 2016

finding your voice {book review}




In Finding Your Voice: What Every Woman Needs to Live Her God-Given Passions Out Loud Natalie Grant uses insights from her singing career as well as her Christian faith to provide a map for women on how to discover who they are and who God has called them to be.

Finding your God-given calling has been a theme in my life lately. My Bible study, the verses I've been reading, the sermons I've heard, and many of the books I've read in the last few months have been about or mentioned calling. It was interesting to read Finding Your Voice during a time when I am seeking to hear God's voice regarding my calling.

Grant talks about how to discover who we are by learning to listen, caring for ourselves, finding our "thrive zone" (i.e. what we are really good at) and learning through failure and brokenness. Grant briefly touches on when she found her calling to help women and girls who are trafficked around the world, but I wish she would have discussed it more.

In Finding Your Voice Grant uses her life experiences, some very difficult and painful, to show readers how they can find their unique voice. We all have a song within us, and Grant shows us how to discover and use it.




Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers <http://booklookbloggers.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” 

Sunday, October 23, 2016

rad women worldwide {book review}



My initial goal when I received Rad Women Worldwide was to read through it and then shelve it until the kids were older and ready to integrate it into their history lessons.

But as soon as Rad Women Worldwide came in the door my kids adopted it as their book. I have found my 3-year-old all over the house this week with the book in her lap, silently flipping through pages and enjoying the illustrations. And my 5-year-old son has brought it to me and asked me to read a page or two that caught his interest.

I even found my daughter sitting on the bed I just stripped with the book in hand this morning!




Since I am planning on teaching my kids in a classical style I can't wait to use this book to highlight relatively unknown historical figures when we are focusing on certain time periods and geographical zones. Of course we are a few years out from that, but I am so excited about homeschool and jumping in and learning with my kids. I love history, but there were still quite a few women in the book whose contributions to the world I did not know.

I love the papercut artwork in Rad Women Worldwide (I think that's a big part of why my kids love it. It is so visually appealing!) and that multiple countries and time periods are covered. I also like the reference section in the back that highlights more fascinating women. The homeschool side of me is really excited to pull that out someday and send my kids out on research trips.

I think Rad Women Worldwide is a great reference book for schools and homes to have on hand. And I think we need to get a copy of Rad American Women A-Z as well!

"I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review."

Thursday, October 20, 2016

a mile wide {book review}




A Mile Wide: Trading a Shallow Religion for a Deeper Faith by Brandon Hatmaker is a challenging book. I am glad there were discussion questions at the end of every chapter, but I need someone to read it with me now!

Hatmaker writes honestly and truthfully about faith and how to create a deep spiritual life at a time when the church is awash in confusion. It's easy to get lost in living a Christian life, in doing the perceived right thing, and following the crowd, but Hatmaker consistently points out what the Bible actually says about discipleship, the church, justice, missions, and living a Jesus focused life.

I've been reading a lot about community and living well with others. A Mile Wide reminded me to continue seeking out those who don't necessarily fit into my everyday life, and to continue building on the idea of creating relationships outside the church.

And in a season when I feel like my faith is rapidly developing and changing this book encouraged me to keep going; to continue learning and seeking time with those who can help me develop my faith.

Every faith based book I have read in the last six months has highlighted two Biblical truths: love God, love others. Brandon Hatmaker takes the same idea and builds a spiritually deep book around the concept so that after reading A Mile Wide one walks away with a blueprint of how to strengthen and deepen one's walk with God.



Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers <http://booklookbloggers.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Monday, October 3, 2016

for such a time as this {love, henri: book review}




Love, Henri is a collection of letters written years ago, but it is a refreshing, reassuring read for the politically uncertain, chaotic world we live in. If we lose sight of our faith and focus on what is transpiring in our world it is straight up scary out there isn't it, friends?

But books like Love, Henri remind us that the world has always been a frightening place with upheaval, wars, and dissension. In 1981 Henri Nouwen was asked in a letter if he thought humanity would survive the century. Here is part of his answer.

"But important for me is not if our civilization will survive or not but if we can continue to live with hope, and I really think we can because our Lord has given us His promise that He will stay with us at all times. He is the God of the living, He has overcome evil and death and His love is stronger than any form of death and destruction. That is why I feel that we should continually avoid the temptation of despair and deepen our awareness that God is present in the midst of all the chaos that surrounds us and that that presence allows us to live joyfully and peacefully in a world so filled with sorrow and conflict."

Isn't that a beautiful reminder of where our focus should be?

In his letters Henri Nouwen doesn't just write about what may happen to civilization and how to maintain hope; he covers every topic. Henri's letters cover subjects from moves to job changes to grief to unfaithful spouses to denominational differences to struggles in the church to difficult friendships to insecurity and rejection to current events to missionary life and fulfilling one's calling ... The list is endless!

I am going to keep Love, Henri on my permanent shelf and refer to it for Biblically sound, Scripture based advice any time I need it. It tied in so well with books I have recently read as well as the 1 & 2 Peter Bible study I am participating in right now I want to keep it close at hand so I can refer to the many sections I marked.


******

If you like this book you might like ...










I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review.

Friday, September 23, 2016

uninvited {book review}




I have to admit, when I began Uninvited by Lysa TerKeurst my attitude was a little smug: I don't need this book! I like the concept of it, but I feel great about myself and I love my friends! I am so loved!

Then I remembered there are moms I hide from, or avoid, or don't try to get to know because they scare me.

Last year I needed almost the entire school year before I would talk to a mom because she seemed so put together. Turns out she's really nice! And I can now say "hello" to her without feeling scared.

This year I watch little ones while their mamas attend Bible Study and a fellowship group. The mamas all look so fresh, their clothes are so cute, and they all have ankle boots (booties? is that what we call these?) and now I think I need a pair ... but please don't expect me to wear makeup. Please. I just can't. I don't know how.

And there I go again - assuming other moms won't like me because I don't look or dress like them.

So yes, turns out I needed this book, because maybe all of these feelings and thoughts inside of me come across on the outside without me realizing it and maybe, just maybe, people are scared to approach me.

Feeling rejected is hard.

Being rejected is hard.

In Uninvited Lysa steps into that hard, raw, really painful space of rejection and applies Biblical truth to deep wounds.

I read Uninvited as an e-book, which was really hard for me because I wanted to write all over it. I took four pages of notes instead. I know, I know, you can highlight and mark passages in e-books, but it's just not the same!

A few things I LOVED about Unvited:

The reminder that "people can't be our soul-oxygen." We have to fill our hearts with the truth that Jesus loves us, because expecting love to come from outside ourselves will just leave us feeling disappointed and rejected.

We need to be in His word before we get into the World and its messages so that what is at the forefront of our minds is His message. I've been getting up in the morning, leaving my phone on the nightstand, picking up my Bible and starting the day with that. I am not allowing myself to touch my phone until I get the Word in front of me, and the kids, because I want His word to be the first thing I encounter every day.

Scarcity Thinking vs. Abundance Thinking: We think, if she gets that - house, job, car, husband, life - what is left for me? whereas God promises He has a plan and path uniquely set out for everyone.

Being given Biblical tools and resources to help me understand rejection, relationships, and how to communicate better. I am not in the middle of any friendship crisis right now - YAY!! - but if I am ever again in a place where things are falling apart with a friend I am going to use this book as a guide to get us both through with intact hearts and souls. Uninvited has useful and applicable advice on how to handle challenging relationship situations well.

I received this book from BookLook bloggers in exchange for a fair review 

Wednesday, August 3, 2016

hope unfolding: grace-filled truth for the momma's heart {book review}




I feel like I've read a lot of books in this vein lately. Like it's popular to write about how hard it is being a mom and how we all feel overwhelmed, but with Jesus moms can do it!

Which is not to say there isn't truth in that!


I am a) a mom and b) overwhelmed and c) so glad I have Jesus to guide me as a parent.

And where some of the books in this category have been a little overdone, Becky Thompson does a nice job of being honest about her life while imparting Scripture based tips on how to mother with faith and joy.

I read through Hope Unfolding on my own, but I would like to go back through it with friends and talk about some of the topics Thompson unpacks. Thompson writes on everything from feeling alone, to feeling insecure, to comparison mothering, to how mothers can rely on God and learn to tune into Him and away from the negative broadcasting that comes from the Enemy.

Thompson's writing about her day to day life is engaging and fun which keeps the book interesting.  After reading Hope Unfolding I wanted to recommend it to my mama friends because it's a great reminder that while parenting young ones is lonely mothers are not alone.

I think this review would be more enthusiastic/longer if I wasn't so tired from getting up with Ainsleigh so many times last night! I guess it's the perfect book for me right now as I feel really worn out and ready to resume the fall/preschool/more scheduled routine in a few weeks!



"I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review."

Monday, July 4, 2016

hope heals {book review}


Katherine Wolf suffered from a devastating brain stem stroke in 2008. She was a young mother with a six month old son when the stroke occurred, and by the odds she should not have survived. But the book she and her husband, Jay Wolf, wrote about the experience is all about defying odds and coming together with the strength of Christ behind them to help Katherine live a fulfilling life. Hope Heals is an incredible story of how quickly life can change, and how to proceed with faith in the midst of extreme uncertainty.



Hope Heals is written from both Katherine and Jay's perspective, but Jay and his experiences as a father and caregiver feature more prominently than Katherine's words. They are both excellent writers though, and the narrative doesn't feel jumpy or tied together awkwardly like it sometimes can with more than one writer.

Katherine writes so honestly about how difficult it is to be a disabled mother. My heart went out to her as she wrote about hearing her son call from his crib, but being unable to pick him up or go to him. Jay's story is one of incredible compassion and a true understanding of marriage vows and what it means to care for someone who is ill. And both Katherine and Jay write about how Katherine's stroke changed their lives and focus, and led them on new unexpected paths. Katherine should have died, but she lived, and recovered better than expected, which led both Katherine and Jay to understand the deep goodness and grace of God and how His plans are far greater than ours.

Hope Heals is an honest story about love, faith, an incredible medical catastrophe, and what a life can look like if God is allowed to lead.

 I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers <http://booklookbloggers.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html

Saturday, July 2, 2016

the real doctor will see you shortly {book review}





I love books about hospitals, doctors and medicine. I don't like hospitals, or doctors, or blood, but I like reading about them! I find medicine fascinating because it has evolved so much over the years and doctors are now able to treat many illnesses and diseases that were fatal not too long ago. But I also think that Western medicine has lost its way and in the maze of insurance companies and hustle to see as many patients as possible the patients have been forgotten.

Matt McCarthy is a physician who focuses on people over procedures and protocol, but as he navigates his intern year in The Real Doctor Will See You Shortly his focus leads to some uncomfortable moments and conversations.

As he works through his first intern year McCarthy is faced with difficult questions: Is he too invested? Where is the line between being too clinical and overly familiar? What should he as a doctor disclose to his patients about his personal life as he is trying to serve and help them?

I enjoyed this book immensely because McCarthy is not afraid to be honest about how uncertain and unafraid he was in the beginning. He's open about the mistakes he made, and how he could have handled certain situations better. And when an accident occurs that shakes McCarthy's world he has to learn how to exist as both a doctor and patient living in uncertainty and fear. (I don't want to give too much away here, because the moment when the accident occurs had me yelling, "Oh no! NO!! in the middle of my living room).

As McCarthy works from novice intern to second year resident he is transformed into a doctor. He gains confidence in his skills, he learns a lot of medicine, and he begins to find a comfortable balance between being a caring doctor and caring to the point of becoming overly emotionally invested.


The Real Doctor Will See You Shortly was so interesting to me I began it after dinner and finished it before I went to bed. I left the dishes a mess, the laundry sitting in the dryer, put the kids to bed, and read until I was finished. I wanted to know what happened to McCarthy, and one of his patients whose story parallels McCarthy's. After reading The Real Doctor Will See You Shortly I have a better understanding of what it takes to transition from medical school to practicing doctor, and how wearing it is on the body and mind. I respect McCarthy and his honesty about his intern year.

If you like Atul Gawande or Paul Kalanithi you will enjoy this book.

"I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review."


Friday, June 24, 2016

lucky find: the no-biggie bunch


I was helping B find books on army tanks at the library, and prying random titles out of Ainsleigh's hands as she tried to shove them in her book bag, when I noticed a book out of the corner of my eye on the bottom shelf. I crouched down and pulled it from the stack.



It was like finding gold.


I don't know why I haven't tried to find books on food allergies before. I guess it hadn't occurred to me .... ? We currently have three no-biggie bunch books checked out from the library. I think we'll eventually own the series. It's so nice for Bennett to read books about kids who have food allergies and need to bring special food with them everywhere.

Now in the book each child has one food allergy, and Bennett has many, but he can still relate! The books have provided many jumping off points for conversations about his allergies and how he feels about them.




          


To buy directly go HERE

I'm not being asked to promote these books, I just really like them!

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