Showing posts with label books. Show all posts
Showing posts with label books. Show all posts

Monday, February 13, 2017

alongside {book review and giveaway!!}




What do you do when a dear friend finds out they have cancer? What do you do when your neighbor, whom you've only met once, experiences a significant loss? What do you do when a family in your church encounters crisis after crisis? How do you help? What can you do? Should you do anything?

Alongside by Sarah Beckman seeks to answer all of these questions with solid, researched advice, much of it drawn from her experiences and the experiences of people she interviewed, all who have been through - or are in the middle of - crisis. I wish I had fifteen (or more!) copies of this book to give away. I wish all of the parents I have met who lost children had people in their lives who read this book, because some of the comments and actions that I have heard about have made a devastating loss even more so. I wish I had a copy of this in my hands years ago, but I am glad to have it as a resource now.



Beckman covers everything from what level of response to a crisis one should have based on their relationship: from Tier 1 to Tier 4 (this is so helpful for those who are trying to navigate how to respond to friends and acquaintances in times of need) to what to say and not to say, and what gifts / offers might be appropriate.

I especially appreciated Backman being honest enough in her writing to admonish people to keep their focus outward and make sure their purpose and intentions are to serve, not glean information, or show off how much they are assisting. Motivations get mixed sometimes and it is important to remember that helping someone through a major life event is for and about them.


Alongside is a useful guide one can pull out again and again as different events in life happen. There are practical gift guides, helpful websites, and practical advice spread throughout the book. You can either read it front to back or use it as a reference guide as needs arise.



I highly recommend this book for everyone who is trying to live out the Biblical edict to love one's neighbor (which is everyone by the way, not just the people next door or across the street). And even if you are not a Christian there is practical, helpful advice within these pages if you are walking through a difficult time with someone.

Thanks to the Blythe Daniel Agency and The Blog About Network I have one copy of Alongside - signed by the author! - to give away. Please leave a comment if you are interested in winning a copy. I'll choose a winner on Friday, February 17th!

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

nothing to prove {book review}



In Nothing to Prove Jennie Allen writes about the abundance of God's love and how we need to put down whatever we are carrying, whatever is slowing us down, or causing us to be numb, or making us strive, and realize that God is enough and He has us in the palm of his hand, we just need to quiet ourselves and rely on Him.

In the second half of the book Allen focuses on various chapters in the book of John and relates them to God's Streams of Enoughness. Those chapters made the book come alive for me. I often feel like I should be doing more for others. I get stuck in routine, we all do, and before I know it we're already a month into 2017 and a lot of the 2016 goals and promises I had in mind have fallen by the wayside.

I was especially convicted by Allen's exhortation to rely on God and let my life and mission flow from that dependent relationship.

Allen writes, "Consider the things that are holding you back - the things you say you don't have enough of .... Now I want you to picture the streets in heaven. I want you to picture streets as far as you can see and every street is full of warehouses as far as you can see.
I just want you to picture all that God has and all that He wants to do.
Then you land in heaven with him. He looks you in the eyes and says, 'I wanted to go crazy through you. I wanted to change your neighborhood, your city. And you kept going up to your room and watching Netflix.'"

For me it's reading a book instead of Netflix, but it's the same general idea! God wants us to be His voice and He wants to work through us, but we have to let go of our fear and anything else that is holding us back and let Him.

Lately my story, my life, my habits have been focused inward. I've been focused on me and how I am feeling and how I need to get better because I can't continue as I have been, but what I really need to do is put all of my need on God and turn my focus outwards. Because I am not the only one who feels like life is hard and overwhelming, and as I learned with my last post, being honest and reaching out leads to more connections and deeper friendships.

It was just such a relief to read Nothing to Prove and be reminded that I can put everything that is going on in my life on God's shoulders and he can use it for His purposes. My life, small though it feels sometimes, can make a kingdom difference if I rely on the power of God to transform instead of my own skills and abilities. Nothing to Prove reminded me that I can't do anything without God, but with Him I can do whatever is asked of me.

“I received this book from the Blogging for Books program in exchange for this review.”

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

what falls from the sky




I selected this book on a whim. I was scrolling through a list of books, trying to decide on a title to read when the subtitle caught my eye:

What Falls From the Sky: How I Disconnected from the Internet and Reconnected with the God Who Made The Clouds

Esther Emery spent an entire year offline. No phone, no computer, no email, no facebook, no blog, no instagram ... nothing to do with the Internet for an entire year.

Could you do it?

I couldn't, but the idea of it is intriguing, so I settled in to read this book one evening and I blazed through it.

I didn't expect the writing to be so descriptive and beautiful. I didn't expect to feel so deeply for Esther and the gut wrenching upheavals that led her to go offline for a year. I loved that she didn't sugarcoat her story; instead she was brutally honest about the job she lost, the strife between her and her husband and how those things affected her life and the choices she made, and eventually led her back to God.

And the background stories that are skillfully woven throughout the book were just as interesting as Esther's reflections on her life.

It was intriguing and sometimes harrowing, to read about what it was like for the Emerys to live in close proximity to a family in crisis, but it was also a good reminder on how to love others well. And the stories about Esther's mother, who was a homesteading back to the land proponent in the 70's, were also fascinating.

Above all else Esther Emery is a good storyteller, and I enjoyed reading about her life and how she came through a time of crisis with her marriage and faith intact.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers <http://booklookbloggers.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”


*This post contains affiliate links*

Sunday, January 1, 2017

lights out {book review}


I have to keep this short since I am still dealing with one hand in a brace. Hopefully my hand will be healed soon; I am ready to have it back!

I enjoyed Ted Koppel's account of the security  risk our power grid is, but I found the first section a little too dry. I really enjoyed the third section about what to do in the event of a cyber attack, although it left me wanting to buy 5 acres and build a bunker!

I like reading disaster plan books, or what if books, because they force me to think about the emergency plans we have in place and what our family needs to do to improve. Reading Lights Out presented the opportunity to ask myself a series of questions: What would we do if the power was out for months? Could we survive? What would change? How would we need to adapt?

One concrete action I've taken since reading Lights Out was to make an emergency box solely for my son who has food allergies. In the event of a major disaster, like 1\3 of the United States being without power, it might be difficult to obtain the foods he needs to stay healthy.

Lights Out is an important book for everyone to read so that they may be prepared in case a large scale cyber  attack is perpetuated on the United States. 

Wednesday, December 21, 2016

merry christmas! {giveaway}



I'm going to keep this short and sweet because I only have one functioning hand. Thanks to The Blythe Daniel Agency and Blog About Network I have a copy of Bible Basics to give away!



This board book primer is NOT just for babies. Bennett and Ainsleigh have asked me to read our copy multiple times since we received it. Bible Basics breaks big concepts down, but leaves enough content for rich discussions. The illustrations are beautiful AND the people depicted are not white! I appreciate the opportunity for my kids to see a more accurate portrayal of Biblical characters. I think Bible Basics is an important book for parents and grandparents to have.



To enter to win a copy please leave a comment. (US residents only) That's it! Like I said, keeping it simple. I'll post the winner Friday evening! 

Thursday, November 17, 2016

journal the word bible {giveaway} - WINNER announcement!


See bottom for the winner!

This is my first time reviewing with the Blythe Daniel Agency and Blog About and I want to think them for the opportunity to review and GIVE AWAY a new Journal the Word Bible.

I've been using a copy of the NKJV Journal the Word Bible (KJV also available) for a few weeks now and I love it! We attend the Saturday night service at our church, which is much smaller than Sunday services, and on Thursday nights we gather with others from the Saturday night service to discuss the sermon and pray together. It's so helpful to have a dedicated place in my Bible to take notes since I know I will need to have them handy when we meet on Thursday nights.

I've also been using it for my Monday night Bible study and it's been so useful to have a place to write notes and comments I want to remember and keep close at hand.

My last Bible didn't have roomy margins so a lot of the pages look like this:




The Journal the Word Bible has wide lined margins so I can take notes without worrying about running out of room. You could draw in the margins as well if you are artistically inclined, which I am not!




The translation is requiring some getting used to since the Bible I've used for years isn't NKJV, but I love the wide margins so much I haven't switched back to my old Bible!

Now for the fun part: you can enter to win your own NKJV Journal the Word Bible! I will select a winner next Wednesday! 


a Rafflecopter giveaway

Saturday, November 5, 2016

finding your voice {book review}




In Finding Your Voice: What Every Woman Needs to Live Her God-Given Passions Out Loud Natalie Grant uses insights from her singing career as well as her Christian faith to provide a map for women on how to discover who they are and who God has called them to be.

Finding your God-given calling has been a theme in my life lately. My Bible study, the verses I've been reading, the sermons I've heard, and many of the books I've read in the last few months have been about or mentioned calling. It was interesting to read Finding Your Voice during a time when I am seeking to hear God's voice regarding my calling.

Grant talks about how to discover who we are by learning to listen, caring for ourselves, finding our "thrive zone" (i.e. what we are really good at) and learning through failure and brokenness. Grant briefly touches on when she found her calling to help women and girls who are trafficked around the world, but I wish she would have discussed it more.

In Finding Your Voice Grant uses her life experiences, some very difficult and painful, to show readers how they can find their unique voice. We all have a song within us, and Grant shows us how to discover and use it.




Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers <http://booklookbloggers.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” 

Monday, October 3, 2016

for such a time as this {love, henri: book review}




Love, Henri is a collection of letters written years ago, but it is a refreshing, reassuring read for the politically uncertain, chaotic world we live in. If we lose sight of our faith and focus on what is transpiring in our world it is straight up scary out there isn't it, friends?

But books like Love, Henri remind us that the world has always been a frightening place with upheaval, wars, and dissension. In 1981 Henri Nouwen was asked in a letter if he thought humanity would survive the century. Here is part of his answer.

"But important for me is not if our civilization will survive or not but if we can continue to live with hope, and I really think we can because our Lord has given us His promise that He will stay with us at all times. He is the God of the living, He has overcome evil and death and His love is stronger than any form of death and destruction. That is why I feel that we should continually avoid the temptation of despair and deepen our awareness that God is present in the midst of all the chaos that surrounds us and that that presence allows us to live joyfully and peacefully in a world so filled with sorrow and conflict."

Isn't that a beautiful reminder of where our focus should be?

In his letters Henri Nouwen doesn't just write about what may happen to civilization and how to maintain hope; he covers every topic. Henri's letters cover subjects from moves to job changes to grief to unfaithful spouses to denominational differences to struggles in the church to difficult friendships to insecurity and rejection to current events to missionary life and fulfilling one's calling ... The list is endless!

I am going to keep Love, Henri on my permanent shelf and refer to it for Biblically sound, Scripture based advice any time I need it. It tied in so well with books I have recently read as well as the 1 & 2 Peter Bible study I am participating in right now I want to keep it close at hand so I can refer to the many sections I marked.


******

If you like this book you might like ...










I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review.

Friday, July 22, 2016

books and faith


In between the child raising and project managing, I read. In between days out and cooking dinner - sometimes while cooking dinner - I read. After I put Ainsleigh to bed, in the space before Bennett's bedtime when he is often occupied with his father, I read.

I always have a book in my hands. I carry the book I am currently reading with me throughout the day. When I wake up I pick it up from where I've dropped it by the bed the night before and deposit it on the end of the kitchen table. As I play with the kids, and tidy the house, and run errands I know there is always a book on the kitchen table waiting to be read. There are days when I don't get to it, but there are many days where I ask the kids to please give me a minute, I'm finishing a page, a chapter, a sentence, a paragraph, a book.

My first year at university I went through a rough patch. Or rather a series of rough patches. And in the middle of it all, I remember wondering what could possibly make me feel better, which led me to realize I hadn't read anything aside from school work since I began my college courses. I didn't have a car so I walked the three miles to and from the public library, immersed myself in books that were not school related, and felt a small part of my life right itself.

I've always enjoyed reading. I've been a reader for as long as I can remember. In fact, I can't recall learning to read. In my memories knowing how to read has always been there. As has my inability to sound anything out because I had taught myself to read before my mother could introduce phonics. I still don't know sounds; I am learning them along with B. He actually has a better grasp on phonics than I do now that he has a year of preschool behind him. I am constantly embarrassed by the fact that I carry a degree in literature but cannot pronounce many common words. It's one of the reasons I prefer writing over speaking; I can't mispronounce a word if I'm not saying it out loud.

For years I've thought long and hard about what I should read. I've put down books I long to read because I can't endorse what's being sold between the pages. Some time ago I gave up my subscription to the magazine Vanity Fair because it was often too far off the mark of what I think and believe, and the photos weren't always what I wanted my growing children to see. I recently went through a period of reading solely Christian based fiction and non-fiction, including the Bible, because I thought that was the path I should walk, but I burned out on the concept of a sole source of words and information quite fast.

This calendar year I've read 100 books - so far. Books that have been about all sorts of things, and that have covered all kinds of subjects. I now think the Bible as base, the Truth as background, is the place to start off, and the platform to jump from, when exploring new titles and genres. If I only read one category I'm not stretching myself, or learning anything, or asking questions about things, or people, or religions I don't understand and haven't encountered. When I attended a Quaker university I wasn't given reading lists that were only (my) faith based, so why limit myself now?

However, I should be careful. From books I can learn anything I want to and explore any topic that captures my imagination, but I can also be persuaded to follow the world, to step away from my faith, to read beyond what I'm comfortable with. Earlier this summer I picked up a bestseller, read a little ways into it, and stopped. I really wanted to read the book. I was tempted to pick it back up and dive back in. But it promoted lifestyles I don't support, and there was a lot of vulgar language, and I knew it wasn't going to get better. So I put it down and picked up a different book.

By deciding to be more careful I've had to let go of the fierce determination to finish every book I start. I hate unfinished books; pages left unexplored, ideas half formed in my brain that the right author can flesh out and help me understand. But finishing a book just to finish it, just to add another book to the long list of titles I've finished isn't worth it. Especially if it pulls my focus from the core Truth I've built my life on.

What should I read? is a question I've asked myself for years. (I even put the question into Google once, hoping for a broad answer that would assuage my worry and ensure me I'm not falling into a pit of sin because I read something other than the Bible, or Christian focused fiction and non-fiction.) But lately I've learned that what I read, as with so much else, is an individual choice. Just like choosing where I spend my money, or how we raise our kids, or what we do with our spare time is an individual choice. And when I choose what to read I strive to select books that challenge me and help me retain sight of my ultimate goals: to live every aspect of my life in a way that is Truth based and God honoring. Because everything I read, and everything I see, and all of the streams of information that bombard me daily are affecting me and shaping me, even when I don't think they are.

Monday, July 4, 2016

hope heals {book review}


Katherine Wolf suffered from a devastating brain stem stroke in 2008. She was a young mother with a six month old son when the stroke occurred, and by the odds she should not have survived. But the book she and her husband, Jay Wolf, wrote about the experience is all about defying odds and coming together with the strength of Christ behind them to help Katherine live a fulfilling life. Hope Heals is an incredible story of how quickly life can change, and how to proceed with faith in the midst of extreme uncertainty.



Hope Heals is written from both Katherine and Jay's perspective, but Jay and his experiences as a father and caregiver feature more prominently than Katherine's words. They are both excellent writers though, and the narrative doesn't feel jumpy or tied together awkwardly like it sometimes can with more than one writer.

Katherine writes so honestly about how difficult it is to be a disabled mother. My heart went out to her as she wrote about hearing her son call from his crib, but being unable to pick him up or go to him. Jay's story is one of incredible compassion and a true understanding of marriage vows and what it means to care for someone who is ill. And both Katherine and Jay write about how Katherine's stroke changed their lives and focus, and led them on new unexpected paths. Katherine should have died, but she lived, and recovered better than expected, which led both Katherine and Jay to understand the deep goodness and grace of God and how His plans are far greater than ours.

Hope Heals is an honest story about love, faith, an incredible medical catastrophe, and what a life can look like if God is allowed to lead.

 I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers <http://booklookbloggers.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html

Saturday, July 2, 2016

the real doctor will see you shortly {book review}





I love books about hospitals, doctors and medicine. I don't like hospitals, or doctors, or blood, but I like reading about them! I find medicine fascinating because it has evolved so much over the years and doctors are now able to treat many illnesses and diseases that were fatal not too long ago. But I also think that Western medicine has lost its way and in the maze of insurance companies and hustle to see as many patients as possible the patients have been forgotten.

Matt McCarthy is a physician who focuses on people over procedures and protocol, but as he navigates his intern year in The Real Doctor Will See You Shortly his focus leads to some uncomfortable moments and conversations.

As he works through his first intern year McCarthy is faced with difficult questions: Is he too invested? Where is the line between being too clinical and overly familiar? What should he as a doctor disclose to his patients about his personal life as he is trying to serve and help them?

I enjoyed this book immensely because McCarthy is not afraid to be honest about how uncertain and unafraid he was in the beginning. He's open about the mistakes he made, and how he could have handled certain situations better. And when an accident occurs that shakes McCarthy's world he has to learn how to exist as both a doctor and patient living in uncertainty and fear. (I don't want to give too much away here, because the moment when the accident occurs had me yelling, "Oh no! NO!! in the middle of my living room).

As McCarthy works from novice intern to second year resident he is transformed into a doctor. He gains confidence in his skills, he learns a lot of medicine, and he begins to find a comfortable balance between being a caring doctor and caring to the point of becoming overly emotionally invested.


The Real Doctor Will See You Shortly was so interesting to me I began it after dinner and finished it before I went to bed. I left the dishes a mess, the laundry sitting in the dryer, put the kids to bed, and read until I was finished. I wanted to know what happened to McCarthy, and one of his patients whose story parallels McCarthy's. After reading The Real Doctor Will See You Shortly I have a better understanding of what it takes to transition from medical school to practicing doctor, and how wearing it is on the body and mind. I respect McCarthy and his honesty about his intern year.

If you like Atul Gawande or Paul Kalanithi you will enjoy this book.

"I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review."


Friday, June 24, 2016

lucky find: the no-biggie bunch


I was helping B find books on army tanks at the library, and prying random titles out of Ainsleigh's hands as she tried to shove them in her book bag, when I noticed a book out of the corner of my eye on the bottom shelf. I crouched down and pulled it from the stack.



It was like finding gold.


I don't know why I haven't tried to find books on food allergies before. I guess it hadn't occurred to me .... ? We currently have three no-biggie bunch books checked out from the library. I think we'll eventually own the series. It's so nice for Bennett to read books about kids who have food allergies and need to bring special food with them everywhere.

Now in the book each child has one food allergy, and Bennett has many, but he can still relate! The books have provided many jumping off points for conversations about his allergies and how he feels about them.




          


To buy directly go HERE

I'm not being asked to promote these books, I just really like them!

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

find your brave {book review}


I initially picked Find Your Brave: Courage to Stand Strong When the Waves Crash In by Holly Wagner from a list of books to review because I saw that it used the story of Paul's shipwreck in Acts 27 to talk about the storms of life and how to handle the trials one faces.




Hey, that will be perfect! I thought. I'm reading through the She Reads Truth Acts study this summer and this book will give me deep insight into one passage.

And then life went sideways all around me. As it does. As it always will. And when this book came in the mail today I tried to set it aside, but I felt like I needed to read it so I picked it up after dinner and burned through it in two hours with a pencil tightly gripped in one hand.

It's one of my 'send a copy to all the people I love' books. It jumped on the list immediately when I thought of four people I wanted to pass it on to - well buy it for, I want to keep my marked up copy for myself - as I began texting quotes to friends.

Holly Wagner uses trials and experiences in her own life - breast cancer, financial hardship, marriage etc. - and the lessons she's learned from them to explore the idea of life storms and how to navigate them with spiritual strength and resources.

Wagner is kind, sympathetic and full of Biblical wisdom, but she is far from gentle in her encouragement to move through the storm and get to the shore - or other side. She expects readers to grow and change, and she provides practical, solid, Biblical advice to get readers through.

I like that Find Your Brave can be blazed through - as I did - and then referred to as storms arise, because as Wagner points out, getting through one storm does not mean the horizon is clear of storms for the remainder of one's days, or read and absorbed slowly. I know I did not gain all the knowledge this book has to offer. I will definitely read it again.

Wagner encourages readers to be anchored in faith, to find hope and courage, to be strong and refuse to quit. Every chapter applies to my life and what I am experiencing right now. And as I face a time when I don't know exactly how to proceed reading Find Your Brave gave me insight on how to move forward: basically the opposite of how my emotions were telling me to proceed. Of course.

Find Your Brave offers wisdom, insight, compassion, and strong Biblical references to support every recommendation and encouragement. I wish someone had put this book in my hands after Charlotte died, because it would have encouraged me and helped me to get through. I would have loved to read about how the purpose of getting through a storm is to get to the shore and help others who are hurting. I figured out that was some of the purpose - though not the reason - behind Charlotte's death eventually, but it took time.

About getting to the other side Wagner writes, "There are people on your shore as well, who need the life and presence of God that is in you. They need to find their brave. God is not looking down at you and me in our storms and feeling sorry for us. No! He is looking way down the road He has called us to travel. He sees a whole bunch of people He needs us to touch with His love. After all, we are His hands. So maybe you feel a bit weak and overwhelmed by all you've encountered (we've all been there), or maybe you think the storm has knocked you off course. Nope. You are in His hands. If you open your eyes, you will see lots of people around you - they are waiting for you to get up. You have made it through a tremendous storm, and other women out there need to know how you did it."

I think what I needed the most from this book tonight was the reminder that I am not in control of life - God is. He sees a bigger, better plan for my life than I can fathom. I'm a little bit stuck on the tiny bit of map I can see right now, but He holds the entirety of my life and the world's life expectancy in His hands and He knows exactly what He is doing. I can rest in the knowledge that I am His daughter and He will not fail me.

Find Your Brave is worth a read. It's worth ten reads. I loved this book.

I received this book from the Blogging for Books program in exchange for this review

monkey moon and other picture book favorites


When we walk in the library everyone at the front desk cringes. I have to bring the stroller just to get all of our selves and books in the door. I bring two huge bags my mom found on clearance at Target when B was in the NICU and we were desperate for clothes and something to store them in. Blue for me, white for the kids. Then we stuff them full of as many books as they can hold, and sometimes more. I've been known to leave the library with two bags full, the stroller top stacked high, and the kids arms full of precarious stacks.

I had to open up a library account for B because we kept maxing out my card. With a 100 book limit we haven't had any problems, but Ainsleigh doesn't have a card yet, so there's the option to stretch our limit to 150 titles if we really get crazy. I'm already trying to figure out how we'll manage when it no longer makes sense to bring a stroller. Everyone brings their own rolling suitcase? Or wagon? Or laundry basket?

On our last library trip I managed to navigate the two bags, two children, two library cards circus without completely embarrassing myself or exasperating the staff, which was a nice change from the usual disastrous check out routine. I've asked the staff to build a corral area with lockable gate around each checkout station, but they haven't complied yet. Perhaps they could just create a small children check out booth that locks. That would be VERY helpful. I'll take carry out service as well. That would greatly improve my library experience. Imagine the possibilities if I was allowed a staff member and rolling cart on every library trip!

Out of the heaps and piles of books we own and borrow here are the ones the kids love/can't get enough of/return to again and again (this week):



We have all five bear and mouse books. I love them, Jon loves them, the kids love them. They're funny, heartwarming, and have a gentle lesson about friendship included in each one. They're great for read aloud, especially with one person reading Bear's lines while another tackles Mouse's. I relate to Bear in many ways. Read the books and you'll see why.




















We discovered this treasure at the library last week. We are all besotted. I love that the story focuses on a father and son going on an after dark adventure to find a beloved stuffed animal. There's some tension and a little bit of worry as Michael searches and searches for his Monkey Moon, but the book isn't scary. And the author presents the search as an adventurous journey which makes the finding of Monkey Moon all the more exciting. I think a big part of my love for this book is how sweet my daughter sounds when she says, "Monkey Moon?" as we read the book.




The content in this book is excellent. Most of it is beyond the kids, but reading through it and solving the math myself exposes them to numbers and math in a fun way. It covers everything from basic counting to division with some shapes thrown in at the end. I love the illustrations as well.




I need to buy a copy of this book. We check it out from the library regularly. I love the story, the illustrations, and the sweetness of this book.




I just discovered the Crinkleroot series. I love it! Easy for kids to understand, with solid facts and interesting information. The kids are really into identifying birds and trees right now so these are great to have on hand. The bird guide is currently overdue at the library. We need to give it back and buy a copy!




What picture books are you enjoying with your little ones right now?

LinkWithin

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
 
Design by Small Bird Studios | All Rights Reserved